Margaret Price inducted into the Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame

The Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame was established by the National Disability Mentoring Coalition (NDMC) to honor those individuals who are making a significant difference in the lives of youth and adults with disabilities through mentoring and to raise awareness about the importance of mentoring for individuals with disabilities.

We are proud to induct Margaret Price into the Susan Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame.

Margaret Price holds an MFA from the University of Michigan and a PhD from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Her book, Mad at School: Rhetorics of Mental Disability and Academic Life, won the Outstanding Book Award from the Conference on College Composition and Communication and was called “the book on mental health and higher education” in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Her work has also appeared in journals and magazines ranging from Disability Studies Quarterly to Bitch: Feminist Response to Pop Culture. Margaret is currently at work on a study of disabled faculty in higher education, and writing a book titled Crip Spacetime. Learn more about her work at her website.

Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame: Information and Inductees

David Johns inducted into the Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame

The Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame was established by the National Disability Mentoring Coalition (NDMC) to honor those individuals who are making a significant difference in the lives of youth and adults with disabilities through mentoring and to raise awareness about the importance of mentoring for individuals with disabilities.

We are proud to induct David Johns into the Susan Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame.

Anyone who knows David J. Johns knows that he is passionate about children—specifically about ensuring that all children receive the cognitive, social and emotional support needed to excel. David is an adjunct professor at American University in Washington, DC. David most recently served as the executive director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans and was appointed to lead the Initiative by President Barack H. Obama. The Initiative works across federal agencies and with partners and communities nationwide to produce a more effective continuum of education programs for African American students.

Under his leadership, the Initiative studied the experiences of students—leveraged a partnership with Johnson Publishing Company—Ebony Magazine—to produce a series of Summits (AfAmEdSummits) at college campuses throughout the country where the only experts who sat in front of the White House seal were students, as young as elementary school. The recommendations students made at AfAmEdSummits have been used to improve policies, programs and practices designed to ensure that students thrive—both in school and life.

Johns has been featured as an influential politico and advocate by several publications and outlets including The Root, NBC, Ebony and the Washington Post. Johns is a prominent strategist who offers commentary for several media outlets including BET, CNN, EducationPost, The Real Housewives of Atlanta and TV One.

Prior to joining the Department, Johns was a senior education policy advisor to the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) under the leadership of Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa. Before working for the Senate HELP committee under Chairman Harkin, Johns served under the leadership of the late Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass. Johns also was a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Fellow in the office of Congressman Charles Rangel, D-N.Y. Johns has worked on issues affecting low-income and minority students, neglected youth and early childhood education and with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). His research as an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow served as a catalyst to identify, disrupt and supplant negative perceptions of black males within academia and society.

Johns obtained a master’s degree in sociology and education policy at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he graduated summa cum laude while simultaneously teaching elementary school in New York City. He graduated with honors from Columbia University in 2004 with a triple major in English, creative writing and African American studies. Johns was named to the Root100 in both 2014 and 2013, selected as a member of the Ebony Power 100 in 2015 and received an early career award from Columbia University, Teachers College in 2016.

Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame: Information and Inductees

Rooted in Rights inducted into the Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame

The Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame was established by the National Disability Mentoring Coalition (NDMC) to honor those individuals and organizations who are making a significant difference in the lives of youth and adults with disabilities through mentoring and to raise awareness about the importance of mentoring for individuals with disabilities.

We are proud to induct Rooted in Rights into the Susan Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame.

The Rooted in Rights Storytellers Series recruits people with disabilities who want to tell stories through video, and mentors them as they write and direct their own projects. The stories are developed by program participants, called Storytellers. Rooted in Rights’ staff of creative professionals provide guidance in structuring their story for a social media audience.

Through mentorship, our Storytellers are able to discover and express their own self-advocacy voices, while also learning practical skills in video production that are applicable to several fields that they could pursue professionally. Lastly, the Storytellers’ videos are distributed via the large Rooted in Rights social media channels so their work is seen by tens of thousands of audience members all over the world, which is a valuable addition to an individual’s portfolio.

What does mentoring mean to you?

The Rooted in Rights team is committed to creating accessible, creative content that inspires our audience to advocate for disability rights. We also are committed to telling stories from the perspective of people with disabilities. In the face of adversity, it is easy to doubt whether one can really make a difference, especially when faced with multiple challenges, but through mentorship, Storytellers learn the power of using their own story to advance the disability rights movement.

By mentoring our Storytellers, we hope to develop a large cohort of people with disabilities who have the technical and creative skills to change media narratives, tell stories that others can’t or won’t tell about disability issues, and have the confidence to push back against the discriminatory forces that so often work against our aspirations.

Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame: Information and Inductees

Stacy Abrams inducted into the Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame

The Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame was established by the National Disability Mentoring Coalition (NDMC) to honor those individuals who are making a significant difference in the lives of youth and adults with disabilities through mentoring and to raise awareness about the importance of mentoring for individuals with disabilities.

We are proud to induct Stacy Abrams into the Susan Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame.

In her own words: “I was born deaf to a hearing mom and dad. Even though they were told by some not to learn to sign, my parents made the decision to learn and use sign language with my older deaf sister and me. Some other family members also learned to sign with us too. I am a proud alumni of Arkansas School for the Deaf. I would not be where I am if I did not have the support of my hearing parents who did everything they could to support me. Because of their commitment to me, I was able to do a lot of things.

I am a Gallaudet & University of California Santa Barbara alumna. I was a teacher for a few years before becoming a Deaf Mentor Program Coordinator in both New Mexico (7 years) and Arizona (2.5 years). Currently, I am the Coordinator of Training for Clerc Center at Gallaudet University where I coordinate different trainings that Clerc Center has to offer. The Clerc Center supports professionals and families through the dissemination of resources, training and evidence-based information in the areas of professional development, family-school partnerships and national collaborations. It is important to support the linguistic, educational and social-emotional needs of deaf kids from birth to high school. My background is in early intervention- mostly in supporting hearing families with deaf children on their journey. I am also a national deaf mentor trainer and also am one of two deaf adults on the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing. Sharing my knowledge and experience with others I something I really enjoy by doing a lot of collaborations, presentations and workshops.

A year and half ago, I came up with the #whyisign campaign to support families on their signing journey. The campaign also includes deaf adults’ stories, stories from hearing professionals, CODAs, interpreters, ASL students, and so forth. They all support signing, and encourage families to sign with their deaf children. The campaign also shares resources for families to continue on their journey of raising deaf children, and that includes deaf culture, deaf community, and happenings.”

Why does mentoring matter to me?
My first mentor was a deaf woman who was in her 50’s when she worked with me, as an 18 month old child. At that time, maybe I did not really understand the concept that we were both “deaf,” but for some reason, I remember always thinking, she and I are alike. I had two other hearing teachers assigned to me, whom I liked, but I did not have the same relationship as I had with Marie. I remember seeing her leave every day at lunch, pulling out the driveway. Because of her, I never questioned whether I could drive or not. Many hearing parents still wonder whether their deaf child can drive, yet alone, go and order food at a drive-thru restaurant!

I want to open hearing families’ eyes to the beauty of a true language, American Sign Language (along with other signed languages), and that it can make the world of difference with their deaf children. What is really important to you? The fact that your child can speak, but have no idea what it means, or your child can sign the word and have the full concept. To do that, I wanted to create a hub of a community that rallies around signing. I strongly believe that everyone who makes a video (deaf or hearing) becomes a mentor to the hearing families who view the videos.

We cannot never underestimate the power of mentoring, and providing support. I will never forget Marie, and I hope that I, as a mentor, can truly provide deaf children & their families a unique way in seeing the world through their hands.

Photography credit: Clare Cassidy

Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame: Information and Inductees

Marie Strahan inducted into the Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame

The Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame was established by the National Disability Mentoring Coalition (NDMC) to honor those individuals who are making a significant difference in the lives of youth and adults with disabilities through mentoring and to raise awareness about the importance of mentoring for individuals with disabilities.

We are proud to induct Marie Strahan into the Susan Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame.

Ms. Strahan is a disability law and policy expert with substantial experience at the national, state, local and tribal level, in law and policy, in general, and in social security disability policy, employment policy, vocational rehabilitation policy, and Tribal service programs, specifically. Her consulting work is primarily in employment and vocational rehabilitation policy for workers with disabilities.

She is proud to claim 25 years in Federal service, serving as a Senior Program Policy Advisor in the Office of Employment Support Programs at the Social Security Administration, as Chief of Staff to the Assistant Secretary of the Office of Disability Employment Policy at the U.S. Department of Labor during the Obama Administration, and as the key Policy Advisor to the Deputy Commissioner for the Office of Disability and Income Security Programs at the Social Security Administration during the Clinton Administration. Ms. Strahan acted as a key policy advisor for SSA’s disability employment and return to work initiatives in the 1990s. She was instrumental in the legislative work on the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (Ticket Act), signed into law by President Clinton in December of 1999. She coordinated Ticket Act policy development between internal SSA offices and an array of Federal agency partners including OSERS, HHS, CMS and CMHS, DOL-ETA and ODEP, the White House Domestic Policy Council, the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Government Accountability Office (GAO), as well as relevant Congressional leadership.

Prior to her work at SSA, she was the lead policy advisor for the Protection and Advocacy Programs at the Administration on Developmental Disabilities and a Policy Analyst in the Rehabilitation Services Administration and the Migrant Education Program at the Departments of Health and Human Services and Education.

Prior to Federal service, Ms. Strahan worked in leadership positions in State, Tribal and local community-based programs for 13 years, with State/Federal systems in Kansas, Washington, Arizona and New Mexico. Her first professional position was with the Navajo Nation where she worked with a talented team of grass-roots advocates and community leaders to develop on-reservation vocational rehabilitation and employment programs for Tribal members with disabilities. The Navajo Nation project was the first of its kind in the nation but there are now over 85 Tribal VR projects in Indian Country, serving more than 100 Tribal communities across the country.

Ms. Strahan has 6 living siblings, four of whom have multiple disabilities, including epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, intellectual disabilities and severe diabetes. In her personal life and throughout her career, Ms. Strahan has worked as a determined advocate for Americans with disabilities.

She maintains her license to practice law in Kansas and has been admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the United States. She holds a law degree from the University of Kansas, a Masters in Administration from the University of San Francisco and a Bachelor’s in Education from Eastern Michigan University. She also holds Certification as a Senior Executive Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School of Government and she has maintained status as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor since 1983. Ms. Strahan is also an active volunteer, supporting Habitat for Humanity, the National Disability Mentoring Coalition, Lawrence Humane Society and many Tribal communities.

Her client list includes: Social Security Administration, Maximus Ticket to Work Project, New Editions, Consortia of Administrators of Native American Rehabilitation, Warrior Society (Jim Warne), and NTI.

Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame: Information and Inductees

Page 5 of 19« First...34567...10...Last »