Understanding the Iceberg Model of Childhood Behavior

An adult speaking to a teenage boy in a calming wayBehaviors are the result of the interactions of two things: the characteristics we possess as people and the characteristics of the situation we face. The theory behind the iceberg model of childhood behavior is that there are many things that influence the way that children act and react: skills, knowledge, experience, social role or values, self-image, traits, and motives. Some (the most conscious) of these characteristics can be seen outright – “above the water,” if you will. The more subconscious or unconscious characteristics are the ones working behind the scenes — “underwater.” It is a mixture of all of these characteristics that will shape a child’s behavior—meaning that the cause of the behavior won’t always be apparent.

The tip of the iceberg—the conscious characteristics that children have in their toolbox—are skills, knowledge, and experiences. Skills represent what children can do innately or things they have learned to do over time. Knowledge is what they know or have come to understand as they’ve grown. This knowledge is shaped by their experiences, which help build both the knowledge and skills available to them in their personal toolboxes.

Under the water, however, are the unseen forces that can shape their behaviors. This portion consists of four large components: their social role and values, self-image, traits, and motives. Continue reading “Understanding the Iceberg Model of Childhood Behavior”

Inclusive marketing: 7 tips for accessible website design

If you want to learn more about inclusive marketing best practices, download our guidebook!

Closeup photo of a keyboardThese days, the first place that people look when they want to learn more about your organization is your website. Your website is your first and best chance to create a positive impression with many people, but is it creating a good impression for you with people with disabilities?

Is your website accessible and inclusive? Welcoming to all? Because let me tell you, if families of youth with disabilities get a bad vibe from your website, they’re not even going to both reaching out or trying your program.

While web design is a very detailed subject, there are some some basic and relatively easy things you can do to make your website more accessible to people with disabilities.

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Inclusive marketing: How to subtitle videos on a budget

If you want to learn more about inclusive marketing best practices, download our guidebook!

"CC" in word cloud, the symbol for Closed CaptioningWhen it comes to making your marketing inclusive for people with disabilities, one of the biggest difficulties is subtitling videos. In a small nonprofit, you don’t have the budget to be able to pay someone to create subtitles for all your videos (we’ve tried it, and boy, can it be expensive!), and you certainly don’t have the time to transcribe all your videos or the video-editing software to then add those transcriptions to your video. This is a real challenge, and one we’ve faced first-hand at PYD.

But lucky for you, there’s a solution! Over the course of our dealing with this challenge, we’ve come across a strategy that is free, quick, and easy for anyone to do, regardless of your technological know-how or background.

Continue reading “Inclusive marketing: How to subtitle videos on a budget”